Understanding Why We Need Our Pollinators

Beekeeping has been documented as far back as the Neolithic communities during the very beginnings of farming and agriculture* and it hasn't changed much other than better protective clothing  and high tech equipment that is completely useless if we no longer have our honeybees. We need to improve these methods along with our overall assumptions and attitudes toward the honeybee. They are not our enemy and we have to understand them better. If they die, we may not survive ourselves.

Our pollinators are the life blood of the food chain accounting for 70% of our crops that feed 90% of the planet one third of the food we eat. This isn't even beginning to address our textiles and if we don't understand them and protect them, we may die without them.

My family and myself have fallen in love with the honeybees. They are a fiercely independent, mysterious and captivating super organism that cannot be conquered. You can only cooperate with them and respect them completely. It is truly a rare human-to-nature experience that will change you forever. I must say they have changed me and I am forever grateful and happy to advocate for the honeybee and all our other pollinators keeping us alive. We take them for granted too often and we must take action to appreciate all they do for us starting now or else risk having no tomorrow to enjoy.

Bees are dying at an alarming rate and our focused and positive coexistence can help both the wild and domesticated honeybee populations along with the other bees that contribute to agricultural pollination.  We can start right now to make changes and adopt bee friendly approaches and practices along with creating and perpetuating bee friendly ecosystems.

We should not give up hope. This will not happen overnight but, if we work cooperatively with our little friends and join together in community we can turn this around and enjoy abundance not to mention the joy of saving something so unselfishly to help mankind.



*Roffet-Salque et al 2015

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